Slimming tea: Does it work and is it bad for you? Slimming teas have become increasingly popular in recent years. They aim to suppress the appetite, reduce fat, or boost the metabolism. However, while weight loss may result, this is largely due to fluid loss. The use of these teas remains controversial, and people are encouraged to use other methods of weight loss. Read now
Green tea also seems to boost physical performance, increase exercise endurance, and decrease reaction time, and there are many, many such studies showing these effects from caffeine, although other ingredients in green tea may aid this effect. Caffeine, and green tea’s, ability to mobilize fatty acids in fat tissue to make them more easily available for use as energy also seems to aid physical performance. In one study, caffeine was shown to significantly increase physical performance (exercise endurance and exertion). The antioxidants in green tea may also help prevent tissue damage during physical exertion as well.
^ Jump up to: a b Zhang C, Qin YY, Wei X, Yu FF, Zhou YH, He J (February 2015). "Tea consumption and risk of cardiovascular outcomes and total mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies". Eur J Epidemiology (Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis). 30 (2): 103–13. doi:10.1007/s10654-014-9960-x. PMID 25354990.
Green tea leaves are initially processed by soaking in an alcohol solution, which may be further concentrated to various levels; byproducts of the process are also packaged and used. Extracts may be sold in liquid, powder, capsule, or tablet form.[4] Decaffeinated versions are also available.[9] Green tea extract supplements are accessible over the counter in various forms.[10]
Caffeine: Everyone knows that caffeine is an external stimulant and raises blood pressure, and is actually toxic in nature (it may be fatal for some animals). Caffeine is also addictive and can have adverse effects on the liver and internal organs over the course of many years. That being said, it is the component of tea which makes it energizing and refreshing, which is why people are willing to risk it.
The best Matcha Green Tea comes from the first flush, baby green tea leaves that grow during the spring. Only the newest buds of the shade grown tea plants are hand-picked for Premium Matcha production. The window for ideal Matcha Green Tea growth is very limited, which is one of the reasons that Matcha is one of the more expensive teas on the market.

The antioxidants present in rooibos tea slow down the aging process and also boost the strength of the immune system. Researchers at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in South Africa found that the local herb helps slow down the degeneration of fat cells, thus inhibiting the formation of wrinkles. Antioxidants in the tea seek out free radicals that damage the skin, hair, bones, and other organ systems by making them vulnerable to diseases and degeneration.


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Tenzo’s matcha green tea will provide you with 36mg of caffeine per serving. 72mg of caffeine for every 1 level teaspoon of powder that you use. Matcha is perfect if you are looking for an extended 4-6 hour energy boost to focus and be productive. There are no jitters, spikes or headaches like you might have experienced previously with coffee. And the best part is, if you’re looking for a larger energy boost, all you have to do is use more Matcha!
Tea culture of Korea was actively suppressed by the Japanese during the Japanese forced occupation period (1910‒1945), and the subsequent Korean War (1950‒1953) made it even harder for the Korean tea tradition to survive.[70] The restoration of the Korean way of tea began in the 1970s, around Dasolsa.[70] Commercial production of green tea in South Korea only began in the 1970s,.[71] By 2012 the industry was producing 20% as much tea as Taiwan and 3.5% as much as Japan.[72][73] Green tea is not as popular as coffee or other types of Korean teas in modern South Korea. The annual consumption per capita of green tea in South Korea in 2016 was 0.16 kg (0.35 lb), compared to 3.9 kg (8.6 lb) coffee.[74] Recently however, as the coffee market reached saturation point, South Korean tea production doubled during 2010‒2014,[75] as did tea imports during 2009-2015,[76] despite very high tariff rate (513.6% for green tea, compared to 40% for black tea, 8% for processed/roasted coffee, and 2% for raw coffee beans).
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