Most Japanese teas are blended from leaves grown in different regions, with less emphasis on terroir than in the Chinese market. Because of the limited quantity of tea that can be produced in Japan, the majority of production is dedicated to the premium tea market. Bottled tea and tea-flavored food products usually use lower-grade Japanese-style tea produced in China.[57]
Experts emphasize that the primary thrust of scientific research has been on the pure tea products -- green, black, or oolong tea, derived from a plant called Camellia sinensis. All of the many other "herbal" or "medicinal" teas found in supermarkets and health food stores may be tasty, and may be good, bad, or indifferent for your health -- but they haven't been the focus of concentrated research, says John Weisburger, PhD, of the American Health Foundation.
Japanese researchers published a study on green tea and its effect on the beta-amyloid protein plaques found in Alzheimer’s disease in the April 2008 issue of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. The protein plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease increase brain cell damage and death due to oxidative stress. The researchers found that green tea catechins reduced the level of damaging free radicals in the brains of rats. The green tea rodents showed much less plaque-induced deficits in memory compared to rodents that didn’t receive green tea and those that were infused with beta-amyloid proteins. (8)
2. Enables digestion: Red tea is caffeine-free and also free of tannins. This element is present in other teas and is known to cause digestive issues among many people. Red tea is a storehouse of antispasmodic elements, preventing diarrhea and gastric issues. It has no oxalic acid, this makes it suitable for those who are prone to developing kidney stones.
Day 1: So you’re supposed to drink your tea first thing in the morning (or before a workout), but I didn’t receive my package until after arriving home for the day (in the early evening). Since I am a slave to my own desire for instant gratification, I said “Screw the rules!” and made my first cup right then and there. Immediate observation: It’s actually pretty delicious. I don’t consider myself a tea connoisseur by any means, so I was pleasantly surprised. I didn’t think it needed the recommended addition of honey.

Do you know what the term “cha” means, which is often found in the names of various qualities of green tea such as gyokurocha, sencha, bancha, matcha, and houjicha? It simply means “tea”, and tea is extremely popular all over India as “cha” (in Bengal & adjacent states) and “chai” in other areas. Just some fun facts for you to share with other tea lovers over your next cup of green tea!


There are also several harmful effects of green tea over-consumption that are possible. These include consuming tainted supplements marked as green tea extract, high caffeine consumption, consuming aluminum, and the effects of tea polyphenols on iron bioavailability. Green tea extracts should not be taken by patients suffering from renal failure, liver disease, heart conditions or major cardiovascular problems without supervision from a doctor. People sensitive to caffeine should be careful of their intake. Pregnant and breast-feeding women should drink no more than one or two cups per day, as some research shows that more caffeine than this amount may interfere with normal heart rhythms.

And not all the science has been favorable to tea. A report in the March 1 edition of The New England Journal of Medicine looking at green tea consumption in humans, found no effect on stomach cancers once adjustments were made for other factors that could affect risk. Those other factors included sex, age, history of stomach ulcer, use of tobacco or alcohol, and other dietary habits.

contains antioxidants, including polyphenols such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which can powerfully quench damaging “free radicals,” metabolic byproducts that are chemically reactive and can damage cells. According to a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the polyphenols found in green tea provide six times the radical-quenching potential of those found in black tea.
The free radicals created in the body are responsible for corroding the body in various ways, one of which we see as the signs of aging and its related symptoms. Antioxidant-rich green tea neutralizes the oxidants or free radicals present in the body. The catechin polyphenols present in it are hugely responsible for its antioxidizing effects, the most powerful among them being the epigallocatechin gallate. Therefore, regular consumption of green tea can effectively delay the signs and symptoms of aging.

Red tea is also known as Black tea in Asia. White, green, oolong, and black teas all come from the same plant, the Camellia sinensis. The difference in their flavor lays on the drying processes of their leaves, which determine how oxidized the final product is. Red tea is made of completely oxidized tea leaves, resulting in a darker and aromatic tea drink.
Burdock Root - a member of the daisy family that originated in Eurasia - is now firmly established as a naturalized plant in North America. Herbalists value burdock for helping to detoxify the liver. The root is served as a food in Japan, where it is known as gobo. Resembling a long brown carrot, burdock can be prepared in the same way you might enjoy a carrot, such as fresh juice or in a stir-fry dish.

Green, black, brown and now, red! No, these aren’t just some colors on the palette of your paint box. They are hues in the world of tea. The latest addiction and addition to the list being the 'red' tea, all the way from South Africa. We are talking about the Rooibos tea. What makes Rooibos tea so popular is the fact that it is known to have 50% more antioxidants than those found in green tea. Rooibos is obtained from Aspalathus Linearis, a shrub native to the Cape of Good Hope.
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