You’ve probably heard a lot about the health benefits of drinking tea, especially the benefits of green tea, considered by many to be the ultimate “anti-aging beverage.” In Okinawa, Japan — one of the world’s “Blue Zones” that’s associated with longevity —drinking green tea daily is considered “essential.” (1) A popular practice is sipping on a combination of steeped green tea leaves, jasmine flowers and a bit of turmeric throughout the day.
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The first green tea seeds and bushes were brought to Japan in the year 1191 A.D. by a Japanese Buddhist monk named Myoan Eisai when he returned from travels in China. The young priest used his experience growing and drinking green tea to popularize what he called “the way of tea” as a meditative ritual within his community of Japanese Buddhist monks. The custom of drinking Matcha tea quickly spread throughout Japan and rose in popularity after being accepted into the daily practice of the samurai.
Because matcha is made from high-quality tea, and the whole leaves are ingested, it’s a more potent source of nutrients than steeped green tea. In addition to providing small amounts of vitamins and minerals, matcha is rich in antioxidants called polyphenols, which have been tied to protection against heart disease and cancer, as well as better blood sugar regulation, blood pressure reduction, and anti-aging. Another polyphenol in matcha called EGCG has been shown in research to boost metabolism, and slow or halt the growth of cancer cells.
We believe that if you’re going to do something, you should do it right. That mentality took us around the world in search of the best Matcha. We eventually landed in Japan, where we found some of the brightest green powder we had ever seen. Japan has warm weather, and receives plenty of sunlight and rain — all of which make it an ideal climate in which to grow leaves.
Day 14: At halfway through my detox, I finally officially figured out what works for me and my body. The plan: my standard first-thing-in-morning cup of coffee, then an iced version of the tea to drink with me throughout the day. I sip it all day long, and it’s both refreshing and hydrating. I can very honestly say I feel AWESOME. I’m having no kinds of digestive problems, I feel lighter while running at the gym, and my stomach is significantly less bloated and more toned.
Generally, the leaves undergo an oxidation (often termed "fermentation" in common tea processing terminology). This process produces the distinctive reddish-brown colour of rooibos and enhances the flavour. Unoxidised "green" rooibos is also produced, but the more demanding production process for green rooibos (similar to the method by which green tea is produced) makes it more expensive than traditional rooibos. It carries a malty and slightly grassy flavour somewhat different from its red counterpart.[3]
Over a thousand years ago, matcha came to Japan as an aid to meditation practice. During long hours of sitting, monks would drink matcha to remain alert yet calm. Modern science has recently confirmed the lessons of centuries of tradition. Matcha is rich in L-Theanine, a rare amino acid that actually promotes a state of relaxation and well-being by acting upon the brains functioning. While stress can induce beta waves an excited, more agitated state, L-Theanine creates alpha waves, which lead to a state of relaxed alertness. And while L-Theanine is common in all tea, matcha may contain up to five times more of this amino acid than common black and green teas.
It depends not only on the processing method the tea producers use, but also on the cultivation practices the tea growers use. What time of year is the tea plucked? How is the plant pruned? What parts of the plant are plucked? Are the plants treated with chemicals or are they organically grown? What kind of heat is applied to the tea leaves to stop oxidation? How are the tea leaves shaped, rolled and dried? Are the leaves left whole or cut in smaller pieces?
Update... I made this tea cold and it was amazing! I read that another reviewer said that it had no flavor? All I can imagine is that maybe he/she is not letting the bag seep long enough? Or maybe using too much water? For my cold brew, I boil 4 cups of water and seep 6 bags for about 30 min. I then add 1 Tbsp honey and about 4-6 Tbsp fresh lemon juice. I keep that in the fridge in a glass container. When I want a drink, I fill a tall glass with ice and pour it over. As the ice melts, it dilutes the tea and is the perfect flavor! Add a sprig of fresh mint in your glass and it's even better! This is my everyday drink... delicious hot or cold!

Matcha is loaded with a rare and powerful group of natural polyphenol antioxidants called Catechins that work to prevent oxidative damage to cells and reduce your risk of cancer* (1). According to the National Cancer Institute, the catechins in Matcha green tea are so powerful that they may actually reduce the risk of cancer, making Matcha green tea one of the top natural cancer treatment options out there.* (2)

Matcha helps prevent cancer due to the presence of EGCG which has chemopreventive properties. Multiple studies have shown that polyphenols present in this tea prevent the proliferation of malignant cancerous cells, and promotes induction of apoptosis. It also assists in reducing the risk of developing various cancers including bladder, colorectal, breast and prostate cancer.

• One Chinese study found that men who drank more than three cups of tea a day reduced their risk of prostate cancer by 70 percent. In another study funded by the National Institute of Health, 79 men with prostate cancer were told to either drink 6 cups of green tea a day or 6 cups of water. After 3 to 8 weeks, the levels of prostate-specific antigen, a protein that may indicate cancer, were lower in the men who drank green tea than those who drank water. An indicator of inflammation, nuclear factor-kappaB, linked to cancer growth, was also lower in the men who drank the green tea.
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